Beautiful Young Girl’s Life Cut Short

Stafford Kansas has a small high school with all the events of larger schools.  One of those events is an annual prom.  This year was not unlike any other.   The girls got their dresses and the boys got their tuxedos.

Girls usually have their hair done up.   And this was what Christine was looking forward to.  Stafford has a high school, but it doesn’t have a hair dresser.   Therefore, Christine had to make 10 the mile trip to St. John.

Highway 50 is the major highway between the two cities, but the old highway between the two is often the roadway of choice.  And this was Christine’s choice on prom day.

Halfway between Stafford and St. John is a 90 degree curve.  What was the reason for Christine taking this curve too fast – knowing she probably took it many times in the past – only she would know.

The call came in as a rollover vehicle accident at the curve on Old Highway 50.  First responder Gail arrived on scene first.   I was the next on scene and Gail reported that Christine was unresponsive  and didn’t have a pulse.

Even though pulseless trauma patients have practically zero chance of survival, I decided to attempt a resuscitation.   Christine had the most beautiful eye lashes that I’ve ever seen.  The medical director arrived on scene before we left for the hospital and after examining Christine he declared her deceased.

I will never forget the pretty young girl who lost her life on that dangerous curve on Old Highway 50.  Let Christine’s accident be a lesson for all that this could happen to you too.   Slow down on curves.

 

The Tall Korean

It happened one fall afternoon at the Salina Fire Department’s main fire station.  A Korean family wanted a tour of the fire station.  I was the watchmen this particular day and tours was one of the watchman’s duties.

We started upstairs and worked our way downstairs to where the fire trucks and ambulances were parked.  I started on the ambulances. I went through the compartments explaining the operations of each piece of equipment.

It was about that time that one of the group told me that I looked Korean and asked me if I was indeed Korean.  I told the asker that I was German as much as I knew.

Unfortunately one of our firefighters was walking by at the time of this conversation.  And from then on I was known as the “Tall Korean”.

Provide Some Leadership

A new book hit the stands that paints a poor picture of Donald Trump and his employees.    His employees were interviewed for the book and they describe a dysfunctional team.

One member states that him and others have had to take letters off the Presidents desk that would have actions that would put America in a bad way.

This is concerning in multiple ways.   First, it is concerning that president Trump was going to take actions that would put America at risk. It is unsettling that we were that close to taking dangerous actions.  Leadership is missing if this is the case.

Likewise, it is unsettling that president Trump’s team thinks that removing written action documents from the president’s desk is the best they can do.   Leadership is missing.

No job is worth doing bad things to the level that is described.  It is time that either president Trump or his team stand up and provide some leadership.

The King’s Speech – Who’s Your Lionel Logue

I was watching an award winning movie called “The King’s Speech” a couple days ago. It’s a movie about Britain’s King George VI and a problem he had. The King had a serious speech stammer.

Fortunately, the King was able to overcome the affliction with the help of an Australian speech therapist named Lionel Logue. Through Lionel’s help, instead of being a laughing stock to the public, the King was able to give an epic speech declaring war against Germany.

The movie has a number of messages. To me the strongest message is how one of the most famous people in history owed his greatness to a support person. So, who are those in your shadow?

Like most people, I’ve had many who’ve been in my shadow. But, I will tell you about just one, the most important one. I have known this person for many, many – many years.
We first met on a grade school playground in 1970. As a girl of fourteen she didn’t know then what a tremendous role she would play in my life. Her name is Rosalia, but most know her as Rosie – or, the Chief’s wife.

Rosie has always worked behind the scenes and has always been supportive of whatever was needed to bolster my career. Yet, she’s never had a title, never had a badge, and she’s never gotten any recognition other than that given by me. That this lack of recognition is okay with her is what makes what she does, and has done, even more special.

In the King’s speech to his people he talks of the “…mere primitive doctrine that might is right.” Those in the limelight are often in the “might.” But, you must not use your might un-rightly, nor should you fail to recognize those in your shadow – those who were instrumental in your success.

Have you recognized those people who’ve played an instrumental part in your life?
Another statement in King VI’s famous speech says, “For the sake of all that we ourselves hold dear, it is unthinkable that we should refuse to meet the challenge.” I say let us apply “the challenge” to recognizing those in your shadow.

Do it soon. Tomorrow – August 28th – might be a good day for some.

“I’m trying to disconnect the Eldorado twitter from this blog.  Did this one work?”

Jimmy at the Bat

The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the SFD that day;
The score stood four to two, with but one inning more to play.

And then when Sanchez died at first, and Johnson did the same,
A pall-like silence fell upon the patrons of the game.
A struggling few got up to go in deep despair. The rest
Clung to the hope which springs from CPR on the human breast;

They thought, “If only Jimmy could but get a whack at that-
We’d put up even money now, with Jimmy at the Bat.”
But Holston preceded Jimmy, as did also Clare Howard.

And the former was an Inspector, while the latter was a Lieutenant.
So, upon that stricken multitude grim melancholy sat;
For there seemed to but little chance of Jimmy getting to the bat.

But Holston let drive a single, to the wonderment of all,
And Howard, the much despised, tore the cover off the ball;
And when the dust had lifted, and firefighters saw what had occurred,

There was fleet-footed Clare safe at second and Holston a-hugging third.
Then from seventeen drunken throats and more there rose a lusty yell;
It rumbled off the roof of station 2, it rattled the old fire bell;
It pounded off Indian Rock Hill and recoiled upon the flat,
For Jimmy, mighty Jimmy, was advancing to the bat.

There was ease in Jimmy’s Incident Command style manner as he stepped into his place;

There was EMT pride in Jimmy’s bearing and a smile lit Jimmy’s face.
And when, responding to the cheers, he lightly doffed his hat,
No stranger in crowd could doubt ‘twas Jimmy at the bat.

Thirty-four blood shot eyes were on him as he rubbed his hands with dirt.
Seventeen tongues applauded when he wiped them on this shirt.
Then while the Salina PD pitcher ground the ball into his hip,

Local 782 defiance flashed in Jimmy’s eye, a sneer curled Jimmy’s lip.
And now the leather-covered sphere came hurling through the air,
And Jimmy stood a-watching it in bugle grandeur there.

Close by the sturdy batsman the ball unheeded sped
“That ain’t my style,” said Jimmy. “Strike one!” Bob Reynolds the umpire said.

From the benches, filled with firemen’s wives, there went up a muffled roar,
Like the beating of monstrous flames licking out a second story floor,
Kill him! Kill the umpire!” shouted Mary Pat from the stand;
And it’s likely they’d have killed him had not Jimmy raised his hand.

With a smile of Christian charity learned from his mama – great Jimmy’s chiefdom shone;
He stilled the rising strike like Norris Olson; he bade the game go on;
He signaled to the pitcher; and once more the dun sphere flew;

But Jimmy still ignored it, and Reynolds said “Strike two!”
“Fraud!” cried Jerry Johnson, and echo off the Sunset outhouse answered “Fraud!”

But one scornful look from Jimmy through his thick head of hair and the audience was awed.

They saw him bite the cigar in his mouth, they saw his huge muscles strain.
And they knew that Jimmy wouldn’t let that ball go by again.
The sneer has fled from Jimmy’s lip, the teeth are clenched in hate;
He pounds with cruel violence – like whipping a cross-word puzzle – his bat upon the plate.

And now the pitcher holds the ball, and now he lets it go.
And now the air is shattered by the force of Jimmy’s blow.
Oh, somewhere in this favored Kansas land the sun is shining bright,

The firehouse band is playing somewhere, and somewhere paramedic hearts are light.
And somewhere firemen are laughing, and little Erin, Anny, Sarah, and Andrew shout;

But there is no joy at the SFD — mighty Jimmy has struck out.The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the SFD that day;

The score stood four to two, with but one inning more to play.
And then when Sanchez died at first, and Johnson did the same,

A pall-like silence fell upon the patrons of the game.
A struggling few got up to go in deep despair. The rest
Clung to the hope which springs from CPR on the human breast;

They thought, “If only Jimmy could but get a whack at that-
We’d put up even money now, with Jimmy at the Bat.”
But Holston preceded Jimmy, as did also Clare Howard.

And the former was an Inspector, while the latter was a Lieutenant.
So, upon that stricken multitude grim melancholy sat;
For there seemed to but little chance of Jimmy getting to the bat.

But Holston let drive a single, to the wonderment of all,
And Howard, the much despised, tore the cover off the ball;
And when the dust had lifted, and firefighters saw what had occurred,

There was fleet-footed Clare safe at second and Holston a-hugging third.
Then from seventeen drunken throats and more there rose a lusty yell;
It rumbled off the roof of station 2, it rattled the old fire bell;
It pounded off Indian Rock Hill and recoiled upon the flat,
For Jimmy, mighty Jimmy, was advancing to the bat.

There was ease in Jimmy’s Incident Command style manner as he stepped into his place;
There was EMT pride in Jimmy’s bearing and a smile lit Jimmy’s face.
And when, responding to the cheers, he lightly doffed his hat,
No stranger in crowd could doubt ‘twas Jimmy at the bat.
Thirty-four blood shot eyes were on him as he rubbed his hands with dirt.

Seventeen tongues applauded when he wiped them on this shirt.
Then while the Salina PD pitcher ground the ball into his hip,
Local 782 defiance flashed in Jimmy’s eye, a sneer curled Jimmy’s lip.

And now the leather-covered sphere came hurling through the air,
And Jimmy stood a-watching it in bugle grandeur there.
Close by the sturdy batsman the ball unheeded sped

“That ain’t my style,” said Jimmy. “Strike one!” Bob Reynolds the umpire said.
From the benches, filled with firemen’s wives, there went up a muffled roar,
Like the beating of monstrous flames licking out a second story floor,
Kill him! Kill the umpire!” shouted Mary Pat from the stand;
And it’s likely they’d have killed him had not Jimmy raised his hand.
With a smile of Christian charity learned from his mama – great Jimmy’s chiefdom shone;

He stilled the rising strike like Norris Olson; he bade the game go on;
He signaled to the pitcher; and once more the dun sphere flew;
But Jimmy still ignored it, and Reynolds said “Strike two!”

“Fraud!” cried Jerry Johnson, and echo off the Sunset outhouse answered “Fraud!”
But one scornful look from Jimmy through his thick head of hair and the audience was awed.
They saw him bite the cigar in his mouth, they saw his huge muscles strain.

And they knew that Jimmy wouldn’t let that ball go by again.
The sneer has fled from Jimmy’s lip, the teeth are clenched in hate;
He pounds with cruel violence – like whipping a cross-word puzzle – his bat upon the plate.

And now the pitcher holds the ball, and now he lets it go.
And now the air is shattered by the force of Jimmy’s blow.
Oh, somewhere in this favored Kansas land the sun is shining bright,
The firehouse band is playing somewhere, and somewhere paramedic hearts are light.

And somewhere firemen are laughing, and little Erin, Anny, Sarah, and Andrew shout;
But there is no joy at the SFD — mighty Jimmy has struck out.